Idaho Skeet Shooting

Posted by Hughes Group Blog Team on Monday, June 4th, 2018 at 11:25am.

 

Guns are pretty popular in Idaho. There is a lot of space to use them and a lot of reasons to have them, such as hunting and different shooting sports, beyond just the general fascination that surrounds guns for many people. Skeet shooting is quite a lot of fun, and one of the more interesting shooting sports to get involved in. If you have a basic understanding of shooting, skeet can also be pretty easy to get into. A shotgun is one of the easier firearms to use and understand, and they are less expensive than most other guns. If you want to get involved with skeet shooting, Idaho is a fantastic place for it. What follows are some things that will help you get started and having fun.

So, what do you need to know? First, as with all activities that involve guns, the most important thing is safety. Guns are dangerous (You probably do not need me to tell you that). Skeet shooting can be a lot of fun, but all of the fun in the world can come crashing down very quickly when you or the people around you are not careful with firearms. There are a few basic rules. Never point a gun in the wrong direction. Most tragedies involving guns start with someone playfully pointing one at a friend or loved one.  You can be as certain as you like that a gun is unloaded and the safety is on, but it is not worth any risk, however infinitely small, that you are wrong. Of course, safety with firearms is all about multiple layers of defense against accidents. This means keeping the safety on whenever you are not shooting and keeping the gun similarly unloading during the same circumstances. Take every measure possible to keep yourself and those around you safe. This is the biggest responsibility that comes with ownership of a gun.

The basic idea of skeet shooting is to hit flying targets with a shotgun. There are devices that propel clay pigeons into the air and make for challenging but hittable targets. This adds an extra something over regular target shooting, both in the requirement of skill for proficiency and added motion. Shooting at stationary targets can be fun, but the variety involved in skeet shooting is on a completely different level.

Bullets and shot travel extremely fast, but not as fast as you might think. You do not just pull the trigger and suddenly the clay pigeon you are pointing directly at promptly explodes. If you point right at the thing you want to hit while it is sailing by above you, the clay pigeon won’t be there anymore once you have pulled the trigger and the pellets have had time to travel to the right place. You have to lead the target if you want to be successful. Predict where the clay pigeon is going to go and aim there. This is a skill that takes a fair amount of practice to get right, so do not sweat it too much if it takes time. Leading a target is only a mathematical equation when you are doing it on paper. When you are actually in the act, it is all based on feeling, past experience, and at least a little bit of luck.

A lot of accuracy is also about how you hold yourself and position your body. Adopt the wrong stance, and you will miss quite a few shots. Shotgun shooting also requires a different stance than most other kinds of shooting, though many of the same principles apply. Shotguns do not have the same sights as other guns. Usually, there is just a little bead at the very end of the barrel. There are several positions to learn and adopt. There is the ready position, so you can hold the weapon comfortably and be rested for those moments of action when you have to life and hold the weapon upright. Keep the stock against your waist where it will not tire you out. Some like to avoid a ready position to just be aiming all the time, ready for the clay pigeon to be launched, but this can be detrimental to your accuracy.

When you are pointed in with the shotgun raised, you keep the butt of the weapon in the pocket of your shoulder (The entire butt against as much of your shoulder as you can get so you if as stable a hold of it as you can get). Keep the arm you use to hold up the weapon parallel to the ground, even though you are probably going to want to bend it to support the gun. An especially important step comes after you take the shot. Hit or miss, do not be too quick to lower the weapon and check on the outcome of your shot. A lot of times, people move the gun as soon as they pull the trigger to check and see if they hit what they were aiming at. This screws up the accuracy of the shot, moving the barrel before the pellets have had all the time necessary to leave the barrel and be removed from its influence on their path. Once you pull the trigger, keep yourself in position for a second more and then, if there are no more shots to take, you can lower the weapon to see what you have done. Have patience. Most of shooting is all about patience. In order to improve upon skills, professional lessons are ideal. 

Like any skill, it will take a large amount of practice to become good at skeet shooting. Whether it is just a hobby or if you want to actually compete against others to test your abilities, you have to keep with the sport and work on it regularly. You can do this without actually loading and firing the gun, utilizing a practice method known as dry firing, but you still have to be absolutely certain the gun will not go off.

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