How to Make the Most out of Your Move to Idaho

 

Idaho is a beautiful state with even better people. Many who plan to move to the Gem State might be a little worried about how they will cope with the weather or if they will find something to do in their city of choice, but don’t fret! Your move to Idaho just might be the best decision of your life once you discover what it has to offer.

The first thing you’ll want to do is to figure out what your future hometown has to offer. No matter which region of Idaho you live in, there will always be a state or national park nearby to explore. The southeast region of Idaho is near Yellowstone National Park, the western region is closer to the Sawtooth National Forest, while those in the northern panhandle will be able to explore the Payette and Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests. Each of these parks is strikingly beautiful and you will eventually want to visit them all but try the one closest to your home first.

You’ll have to make multiple trips to discover all the monuments and incredible views, so don’t think you’ve seen it all after just one visit. Yellowstone alone will take you nearly a week to hike through the various trails and visit the geysers, so an overnight camping trip might be the best plan for your trip. Before spending the night in any state or national forest, make sure you obtain a permit from the local forest rangers and notify them of your plans. Remember, you are a visitor in these parks, but it is the ranger’s full-time job to know which views are the best and which areas are you should avoid. Feel free to ask them any questions you can think of. You might also consider visiting the Craters of the Moon National Monument, an ancient lava flow that covers nearly 1,000 square miles in the southeast region of the state.

If the national parks don’t interest you, there are many other activities that you might enjoy. You can always contact a local horse farm to inquire about horse rides or raft down a nearby river. Beginners might want to try their hand at the North Fork Payette River, just an hour north of Boise. You’ll get your feet wet (literally) on one of Idaho’s most famous rafting destinations and you might even discover a new hobby! Sun Valley Ski Resort is also a great choice for winter activities, such as skiing or snowboarding. If you enjoy snowmobiling, there are many places throughout the state you can rent them. You might want to take a weekend trip up to Island Park near West Yellowstone, where you can rent a cabin and spend your waking hours cruising the miles upon miles of snowmobile trails. If you’d rather visit this beautiful town during the summer, you’ll need to rent ATVs and jet skis instead.

Idaho is also home to many delicacies and great food. You’ll be surprised at how innovative Idahoans can be with a few simple ingredients. If you enjoy fried chicken, you might want to check out southern Idaho’s finger steaks— small strips of sirloin battered and deep fried, served with a side of fries with cocktail or fry sauce. Fry sauce is a condiment popular in Utah and Idaho that is usually a mixture of mayonnaise and ketchup, among other spices, that you need to try at least once. If you ever leave Idaho, you might find yourself desperately searching grocery stores for another bottle of this delicious condiment that you can put on almost anything from your favorite fast food restaurants. Another rich food is Idaho’s famous White Sturgeon Caviar, fished from the snake river which runs throughout the state. You might find yourself paying $50-$60 per ounce, but it is known to many as America’s finest caviar, so make sure you get it fresh!

When you move to a new city or state, you get a chance to reinvent yourself. Idaho’s population is rather small at 1.7 million residents, but you’ll find that Idahoans make up for their small population with a surplus of kindness. Don’t be surprised if you are approached by your new neighbors within hours of arriving and invited to various parties and activities. If you still have the energy to socialize after the stress of your move, you might find your new best friends right on your street. Idaho has a high rate of home ownership (around 70 percent since 1984), so many residents are excited to get new neighbors and meet new people. As you are unpacking your belongings, don’t be afraid to accept the help of your new neighbors and sometimes the entire street who will likely stop by and offer their assistance. You’ll find it easier to be friendly to Idahoans once you feel how accepting they are, and you just might not ever want to leave!

Do you love animals? Idaho is one of the greatest places in the lower 48 to come across grizzly bears and elk in the wild, so take the time to peer through the forests and sagebrush as you are traveling from town to town. Those who are particularly lucky might catch a glimpse of the elusive gray wolf, of which there are about 1,800 left in Idaho. These beautiful canines have been known to attack livestock, so never approach them directly, but feel free to safely enjoy the view from behind your car windshield. You might also see many species of eagle, including America’s national bird, the bald eagle. Those who find themselves traveling through Boise should visit the World Center for Birds of Prey, where you’ll come face to face with many of Earth’s most iconic raptors. You won’t be disappointed!

In short, Idaho is a remarkable place to live. You might think that everyone says that about where they live, but you’ll feel a special kind of magic while you are in this incredible state. The food is great, the views are stunning, the neighbors are friendly, and wildlife can be found just about anywhere. What’s not to love?

Sources:

· https://www.nps.gov/crmo/learn/historyculture/index.htm

· https://www.idahostatesman.com/entertainment/ent-columns-blogs/words-deeds/article169039947.html

· https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/217152/idaho-fry-sauce/

· https://www.markys.com/Caviar/American-White-Sturgeon-Caviar.html

· https://www.saveur.com/how-americas-finest-caviar-gets-made

· https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/IDHOWN

· http://idahoptv.org/sciencetrek/topics/wolves/facts.cfm

· http://www.peregrinefund.org/visit

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